0
  •  x 
No products in cart

Old Galway

The Warwick Hotel

 

Mrs. Holmes was a relation of the O’Hara-Burkes who owned Lenaboy Castle and the Lenaboy Estate. She persuaded them to sell some of their land, ‘the lower pasturelands’ farthest away from the house, down near the gates of the estate to be precise. There, she built the house in our photograph which became known as ‘Greenmount’.

Read more ...

Reconstruction of the Galway Fishery

 

Based on the McMahon Report, a survey involving the engineers of the Commissioners of Public Works in consultation with local businessmen and anglers, works were undertaken to improve drainage, to facilitate navigation and to provide waterpower to the many mills in Galway. Waterpower was the bedrock on which the industry of Galway City was based and by the mid-19th century, there were some 30 mills in the city with associated headraces and tailraces which resulted in an intricate network of small waterways which greatly added to the charm of Galway.

Read more ...

The Lynch Window

 

In 1807, the Reverend Edward Mangin wrote a 3-volume romantic novel entitled George the Third in which he headed one of the chapters “Which would not have appeared had it not been written”. In it he invented a story about the Mayor of Galway, James Lynch Fitzstephen, hanging his son. Thirteen years later James Hardman published his History of Galway in which he slightly changed, and greatly elaborated on the story.

Read more ...

ANCO, 50 years a-growing

 

1967 saw a great change in Galway as the industrial estate was being developed as a result of the Government’s decision to designate Galway as a development location, a place which would be the commercial, financial, educational, health, social and administrative centre of the region. The IDA were buying land and building factories in anticipation of attracting industry to the county.

Read more ...

The Parochial School

This is the time of the year when children are preparing to go back to school, a time when many of us would think back to our own schooldays, the happiest days of our lives. The issue of primary schooling in Ireland was contentious during the 17th-19th centuries because formal education was provided by Government only in association with Protestant Evangelical Societies and the Church of Ireland.

Read more ...

Street Festivals

 

The first street festival held during the Quincentennial year of 1984 in Galway was organaised by High Street, Cross Street and Quay Street from the 23rd – 29 of April. It was opened by Mayor Michael Leahy with the Army Pipe band, St. Patrick’s Brass band, St. Patrick’s Boys Band, Renmore Brass band and the Dockers Fife and Drum Band all playing on the streets.

Read more ...

The Piscatorial School

Living conditions were very bad in the Claddagh during the Famine. Most people there made their living from the sea but they refused to adapt to new and more effective fishing techniques which would have improved their catches, and so their income was affected and poverty ensued. Most of the fishermen there had put their nets in hock just to keep their families alive. Equally, Claddagh people were opposed to education, as their sons would grow up to be fishermen, they felt no need to send them to school.

Read more ...

The Docker's Rugby Team

Galway Rovers Rugby Football club first played competitively in 1899. In 1907, they won the Connacht Junior Cup, which had been presented two years previously to the Union by Professor Alfred Senior. The club disbanded after that, probably during World War 1, but it was revived by a man named John L. Sullivan in 1931.

Read more ...