×


 x 

Shopping cart

Old Galway

THE ART OF THE LETTER HEAD

by Tom Kenny

Our illustration today is of the letterhead of J.J. Ward who owned The Motor and Cycle House on Eyre Square. This building is shown on the left of our illustration. It was originally occupied by Gilbeys and was next door to what is the Imperial Hotel today. James Ward set up in business here in 1903 and invited the public to ‘inspect the largest stock, the best chosen variety and the best value in Connaught in Cycles and Accessories’. In 1909 he wrote “In my repair shop, I have the same group of hands working who have worked under me for 6 years – they know their work and do it well. I’ll give you a cycle for £7. 7s as good as you can get elsewhere for a much higher price. In fact it is worth £9. 9s.”.

Read more ...

BLAKE’S CASTLE, QUAY STREET

by Tom Kenny

This drawing of Blake’s Castle was done in 1847 by George Victor Du Noyer, a Dublin born artist, geologist, and antiquarian who spent much of his life recording natural features and archeological sites around the country in the 19th century.

Blake’s Castle is a medieval town house built c.1470 having single bay ground and first floors and a 2-bay second floor. It has a flat roof with a crenelated parapet with a projecting machicolation on supporting corbels on the top floor above the entrance. This was an opening at the parapet through which defenders could drop stuff like boiling water down on would-be attackers. It was built with coursed roughly dressed limestone rubble walls with square-headed window openings to the upper floors.

Read more ...

THE FORSTER STREET TIMES, 1964-1966

by Tom Kenny

Those were the years that a very enthusiastic and talented group of children in the Forster Street area ran a local newspaper each summer under the banner ‘The Forster Street Times’. Their motto “Frank, Fearless and Free” was beneath the title. It was frank, it was fearless but it was not free, it cost a penny an issue for the first two years. Economic circumstances being what they were in the mid-sixties, they were forced (because of the heavy cost of printing and the increased wages for the staff) to put the price up to two pence per issue in their third year.

Read more ...

THE HOLLAND INFLUENCE IN GALWAY

by Tom Kenny

In the year 1900, Patrick Holland had a travelling shop near Athenry. He later opened a shop there and is credited with having the first car in the town. In 1914 he met Dorinda Egan and it was love at first sight. They married and had five children Brendan, Michael, Maureen, Angela and John. They eventually moved to Galway in 1930, and tried to set up a business in Dominick St. but the bank would not give them the money. They eventually managed to buy the premises of Mary Leahy’s Newsagency in Williamsgate Street.

Read more ...

AN BEARNA

by Tom Kenny

In 1928, Galway Urban Council prosecuted a Mr. James McHugh from Bohermore for failing to comply with a notice requiring him to remove his butcher’s stall at Kingshill, Salthill, on the grounds that he had built it without authority, beyond the alignment of the adjacent houses. In fact, Mr. McHugh had already sent the council a letter requesting permission to build the stall but the council were not yet aware of their powers at the time, and their solicitors had advised them that they, the Council, did not have any control over the erection of such structures. Though they did not approve of the stall, they had failed to notify Mr. McHugh. The case went in and out of court but the stall stayed where it was.

Read more ...

THE GALWAY CAMOGIE TEAM 1937

by Tom Kenny

It is heart-warming to see the Galway Senior Camogie Team travelling to Croke Park on Saturday to play an All-Ireland final against Kilkenny, so, to honour the team of 2020, we thought to show you the team of 1937 who, having beaten Sligo in the Connacht final, went on to beat Antrim in KIllester in the semi-final of that year. The score in the game was Galway 5 – 0 to Antrim’s 3 – 3.

Read more ...

JOE HOWLEY, PATRIOT

by Tom Kenny

Michael Joseph Howley was born in Oranmore in 1895. His father died when he was just two years old. His mother was a sister of Peter Rabbitt, the proprietor of Rabbitt’s Provision Shop, Licenced Premises and Lodgings in Forster Street. She later married William Keane, the owner of Keane’s Bar in Oranmore. Joe, as he was popularly known, attended the local primary school and later went to the Bish in Galway. He obviously worked at farming as his mother once wrote “He made a good lot with trading with cattle and sheep”.

Read more ...

THE PERSSE WINDOWS, ST. NICHOLAS’ COLLEGIATE CHURCH

by Tom Kenny

The church of St. Nicholas of Myra was first built c.1320, making it 700 years old this year. It is the largest medieval church in Ireland and there has been constant Christian worship there since it was built. The chancel with its three windows in the south wall dates from the beginning, the nave and the transept date from about a century later. In 1477 Christopher Columbus is believed to have worshipped here. In 1484, the Church was granted Collegiate jurisdiction by which it was to be governed by a warden and vicars who would be appointed by the mayor and burghers of the town.

Read more ...