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Leo E. A. Howe - Being Unemployed in Northern Ireland: An Ethnographic Study - 9780521382397 - KKD0003492
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Being Unemployed in Northern Ireland: An Ethnographic Study

€ 17.95
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Description for Being Unemployed in Northern Ireland: An Ethnographic Study Hardcover. This is a major ethnography of unemployment and the first community-based book on contemporary unemployment in the United Kingdom. Num Pages: 276 pages. BIC Classification: 1DBKN; JFFA; JHMP. Dimension: 228 x 152. Weight in Grams: 55. Good clean copy with some minor shelf wear. Dust wrapper has some minor edge wear but remains very good
Age-old ideas about the deserving and undeserving poor are still pervasive in our society. Stereotypes of the scrounger and the malingerer, and the widespread belief that much joblessness is voluntary, continue to constitute the ideological basis of conservative social policy on unemployment and poverty. In this study of unemployment in Belfast, Dr Howe successfully refutes some of the widely held myths about the black economy, the welfare benefit system and the so-called culture of dependency. This is a major ethnography of unemployment and the first community-based book on contemporary unemployment in the United Kingdom. It is an account of the ... Read more

Product Details

Format
Hardback
Publication date
1990
Publisher
Cambridge University Press
Condition
Used, Very Good
Number of Pages
276
Place of Publication
Cambridge, United Kingdom
ISBN
9780521382397
SKU
KKD0003492
Shipping Time
Usually ships in 2 to 4 working days
Ref
99-1

Reviews for Being Unemployed in Northern Ireland: An Ethnographic Study
'He has produced a perceptive and sympathetic analysis of the unemployed which will be read not only by anthropologists, but by all disciplines and professions concerned about the human cost of unemployment.' Man '

Goodreads reviews for Being Unemployed in Northern Ireland: An Ethnographic Study